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patent reform act of 2011

This tag is associated with 30 posts

Irresponsible (Or Dishonest) Journalism From SF Chronicle On Patent Reform

Gary Shapiro’s ridiculously misinformed views on patent reform and Stephen Foley’s ignorant rant about “patent value” were (in addition to complete garbage) arguably nuanced opinions, albeit borrowed from others without regard to actual fact.  But James Temple’s piece on the San Francisco Chronicle’s Business Report absolutely takes the cake as  far as irresponsible journalism goes.  … Continue reading

Sub-Prime Patent Coverage From The Independent

Stephen Foley, evidently a prolific writer for the UK journal The Independent, evidences fundamental misunderstandings of the patent system. After oversimplifying the “mortgage crisis” in America, Foley relates the phenomenon to the US patent system: Now consider the US patent system. An explosion in the number of patents being filed with the US Patent and … Continue reading

Gary Shapiro Shilling A Massive Load Of Patent Tripe

Gary Shapiro, blogging over at Forbes.com, appears to have swallowed a load of patent tripe that he now wants the rest of us to swallow, but he’s got a lot to learn about patents. If you’ve accidentally swallowed some of Gary’s tripe, consider this post your heartburn medication. From his article on reforming the patent … Continue reading

Patent Reform Boosters Invent Facts To Combat Real Arguments

Ideologically speaking, I can’t support something when that thing’s supporters resort to lies and misdirection to “prove” why I should support it.  So, just add this to the list of reasons why I oppose patent reform: Determined to battle what he calls “misinformation and distorted commentary” about first-to-invent, Kappos and his team turned to the … Continue reading

A Radical Alternative Patent Reform Proposal: Eliminating The Non-Obvious Requirement

Congress is debating patent reform once again, with the House Judiciary committee hearing testimony from USPTO Commissioner David Kappos and other witnesses today about first-to-file and prior user rights.  The most significant problem, as has been repeated time and again, is the backlog of 1.2 million applications currently pending, and 700,000 applications that have yet … Continue reading

If Patent Interference Practice Is Too Expensive For Inventors, Why Is Eliminating It The Answer?

New Scientist reporter Paul Marks has written one of the more balanced articles on patent reform that I’ve read in a very long time.  In it, Marks recounts the tale of an American inventor who defeated firms from Japan and Europe, prevailing in his effort to prove the American was the earliest inventor by two … Continue reading

Congressman Proposes Sensible, Two-Step Patent Reform Process

Earlier today I reprinted a statement from Maine Congressman Michaud voicing his opposition to the proposed patent reform bill (pdf). The most salient point from Michaud: Patent reform should focus on addressing the Patent and Trademark Office’s backlog, first, and do no harm, second. By far, the least controversial aspect of patent reform are the … Continue reading

Rep. Michaud Reacts to House Patent Reform Bill

Responding to the introduction of the America Invents Act, Maine Congressman Mike Michaud just released the following statement: “I am disappointed and concerned with the ‘America Invents Act.’ Patent reform should focus on addressing the Patent and Trademark Office’s backlog, first, and do no harm, second. As introduced, this bill would be bad for American inventors, … Continue reading

Diverse Group Of Patent Stakeholders Urge Congress Not To Devalue Valid Patents

I’ve received a letter that was sent on behalf of “innovators, patent holders, patent users, venture capitalists, small businesses, universities, and associations representing literally thousands of entities who care deeply about keeping America the most innovative economy in the world” and addressed to the Chair and Ranking Member of the House Judiciary committee, presumably in … Continue reading

House Patent Reform Bill Broadens Prior User Defense

I received a copy of what appears to be the House version of the Patent Reform bill (also dubbed the “America Invents Act”).  Just like S.23, the house version includes the poorly drafted first-to-file provisions and the post-grant review procedures.  The House also appears to be catering to the tax and financial industries by maintaining … Continue reading