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Patent office

This tag is associated with 26 posts

Inventor Of Patented CGI Technique Runs To Court After A Walt Disney Runaround

Joe Alter invented an improved technique for computer generated animation back in 2000, and was awarded US Patent 6,720,962 in 2004. According to Alter’s patent, his invention allows for “creation of a highly stable coordinate system involving guide columns in which Cartesian physical simulations may be carried out and rendered as well as deformed and … Continue reading

The Patent Will Go On … A Re-examination Cautionary Tale

On the surface, re-examination appeared to be a sound strategy. But just as an iceberg carries but 10% of its mass above the surface, this Titanic-esque re-exam strategy lay vulnerable to the unseen mass lurking below. Continue reading

Did Serial Infringers Commission “Academic” Patent Study To Support Widespread Infringement?

Prior to Gametime IP, the strongest defense of NPE-based patent litigation generally resolved around the fact that it is every patent owner’s right to take accused infringers to court, whether we like it or not. Our public discourse largely lacked any affirmative argument for the value created by NPEs, giving infringing companies free reign to pollute the literature with only anti-patent owner content. Thankfully, those days are over. Continue reading

Patent Office Deputy Director Rea Lays Out Administrative Initiatives

On Mackinac Island, MI, Deputy Director Teresa Stanek Rea spoke candidly about changes to the USPTO under the leadership Director David Kappos, including patent reform, administrative procedure, the backlog, and harmonization efforts, among other issues. Notably, a 15% fee hike is on the table if patent reform ends up passing. Continue reading

An Insulting Proposed “Compromise” To Patent Office Funding Amendment

Imagine this scenario: every morning as you leave your house, the same person accosts you, punches you in the nose and takes $10 from your wallet. Eventually, you get in touch with someone in charge of regulating such boorish behavior and you convince regulators to draft a decree stating that your perpetrator shall no longer … Continue reading

O’Reilly Radar Desperately In Need Of Patent WD-40

Over at the O’Reilly Radar blog, writer Andy Oram asks “Should the patent office open its internal guidelines to the public?” The question in Oram’s blog title is the last thing that needs to be addressed, however.  The first thing that needs to be addressed is the following paragraph: As a simple example of the … Continue reading

Practical Implications Of Supreme Court’s Role In Patent Policy

Microsoft has asked the Supreme Court to overturn a long-standing rule that requires patent challengers to demonstrate invalidity of a patent by “clear and convincing” evidence (as opposed to the more common civil standard of “more likely than not”).  I’ve mentioned before that this case could have a significant impact on patent value across the … Continue reading

Patent Reform Boosters Invent Facts To Combat Real Arguments

Ideologically speaking, I can’t support something when that thing’s supporters resort to lies and misdirection to “prove” why I should support it.  So, just add this to the list of reasons why I oppose patent reform: Determined to battle what he calls “misinformation and distorted commentary” about first-to-invent, Kappos and his team turned to the … Continue reading

Rising Patent Application Abandonments

Over at PatentlyO, Dennis Crouch posted some updated statistics about patent allowances, which projects another record year of allowances.  In response to last year’s 200,000+ patent allowances, Techdirt‘s Mike Masnick claimed that the patent office was just rubber stamping applications: Commerce Secretary Gary Locke has made it clear that he wanted to US Patent and … Continue reading

Patent Office To Act On Older Applications This Year

Patent office delays are getting ridiculous. As I’ve previously reported, the 35 month total pendency is misleading, but the 24+ month delay to until first action is disastrous.  Today, the an Examiner’s blog brought some good news to inventors that have been kept waiting: Let’s start with the bottom line: The Office wants all applications … Continue reading